Log Size – an explanation

Hi all,

You might have noticed some new bar graphs like these at the top of your detailed stats pages:

bar-graphs.jpg

These graphs are designed to help you to better understand the log size of your project.

The green area of the bar graph shows you the amount of ’empty’ slots you have left in your current log. Using this information you can decide whether or not you would like to upgrade your account – remember there is absolutely no pressure on you to do so!

If you click on ‘Adjust your log size here!’ you will see a pie chart – this gives you the same info as the bar graph.



pie-charts3.jpg

If your log is full and you don’t want to lose any of your detailed data, then it’s time to upgrade. If you don’t mind losing this old data, then no action is required on your part.

We’ve included a Q&A section below covering the most common questions we get asked about the StatCounter log size. As always, you’re more than welcome to post a comment or query about this topic below. For support issues, please contact us here.



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Log Size – what’s that?
Your log size reflects the number of ‘slots’ that are reserved for you in the StatCounter database. Every time someone views a page on your site, one ‘slot’ is populated with information on that pageload. You get 500 slots in the StatCounter database for each project you create. With upgraded accounts you get additional database space, which you can allocate to your projects as you wish.

What happens when the log is full – does it stop tracking? Do I have to upgrade to a paid account?
Absolutely not! When your log becomes full, we simply overwrite the oldest entry in the database, with information on new pageloads you receive. There is no obligation to upgrade.

How many visitors will be recorded by my free account?
StatCounter gives you a log size of 500 with every project created. Unfortunately, it’s not possible to know how many visitors can be recorded in these 500 database slots – it depends on the behaviour of your visitors. For example, if 500 separate people each visit your homepage once, then your log will contain information on all 500 visitors.

500 people x 1 pageload = 500

If 50 people each visit 10 pages on your site, then your log will contain information on these 50 people.

50 people x 10 pageloads = 500

Why does it matter what my log size is?!
StatCounter gives you lifetime summary stats together with highly detailed analysis of your last 500 pageloads for free accounts (more for upgraded accounts). In other words, your log size determines the amount of detailed analysis you can see on your stats. With a free account, detailed stats (eg Visitor paths, Came From, Keyword Analysis…) will be available for the last 500 pageloads.

NOTE: If you have still have a 100 log free account, then see here to adjust your log!! 500 logs have been available free since May of this year.

77 comments on “Log Size – an explanation

  1. Sorry guys but all this means is that I have to look at an annoying red bar every time I check my stats. Seriously, who doesn’t have at least 500 page loads on their site?

    Every person’s bar is going to be totally red after like a day so what’s the point? Please allow us to turn that thing off.

    StatCounter Team Response:

    Hi Court,

    LOL! Unfortunately, not all of us get 500 hits a day Court – maybe you could share some advice??!! 😉

    The bar chart was added in response to customer demand. People often reset their stats and want to know how much of their log has been ‘used up’ – it’s also important for people who upgrade to larger log sizes. For example, someone who has 10 different projects might upgrade to get an extra 10,000 log – using the bar graphs they can decide how to appropriately allocate this across their different projects (sites). Does that make sense?

    Your point re “switching off” the bar chart has been noted – we will see what we can do.

    Thanks for your support!

  2. >>500 people x 1 pageload = 500

    Oh.. 500 pageload only??

    My blog has 600/1000 pageloads everyday. So, Statcounter is not able to keep the log for one day at least??

    >>1,500 pageloads for US$89..

    So, it can keep my log for 1.5 day?

    I didn’t know that 500 is pageloads.. 🙁 I thought it might be 500MB..

    StatCounter Team Response:

    Hi Michael,

    Nice work with the traffic to your site!

    With our free accounts, we provide individual visitor detail on the last 500 pageloads.

    We also provide lifetime summary stats, covering the full period since you started tracking with us.

    You can of course upgrade to have a longer period of detailed data available to you online, but you can also download your log at regular intervals too.

    If you have any more questions on this, please let us know. We would be more than happy to help.

  3. User, I sometimes use Google Analytics in combination with StatCounter, but I never use it alone. Google Analytics simply doesn’t tell me what I want to know. Well, maybe it does, but not in any easu-to-find way.

    StatCounter log sizes are fairly straight-forward to adjust, but it’s good to see a blog article like this because if someone asks a search engine for info on the issue then this article should be easy to find and easy to understand. Nice work :p

  4. So, old accounts only have a log size of 100 but new accounts get 500? Should I delete my accounts and start over to get the 500?

    StatCounter Team Response:

    Of course not Pam!!

    Since May of this year, ALL free accounts get a log size of 500. Check out this post to find out how to adjust your log.

  5. Very nice, being able to see log usage via the bar is very useful. I can see at a glance which projects are in need of a greater log size. Nice detailed explanation too, I’ve been guessing and assuming how it all worked up until now.

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