Chrome – Who’s Losing?

Hi folks,

Here are the Global Browser Market Share stats for the last few days.

Looking at these numbers we can begin to identify which browsers are losing market share to Chrome.

IE FireFox Safari Chrome Other
Aug 28 68.17% 24.66% 2.83% N/A 4.33%
Aug 29 67.81% 24.78% 2.84% N/A 4.57%
Aug 30 65.41% 26.38% 3.04% N/A 5.17%
Aug 31 64.49% 26.91% 3.06% N/A 5.56%
Sep 01 66.92% 25.26% 2.99% N/A 4.84%
Sep 02* 67.58% 24.36% 2.91% N/A 5.06%
Sep 03 67.81% 23.54% 2.70% 1.11% 4.87%
Sep 04 70.87% 21.26% 2.48% 1.15% 4.25%




The below table outlines the changes in market share over the period:

IE FireFox Safari Chrome Other
Aug 28
Aug 29 (0.36%) +0.12% +0.01% N/A +0.24%
Aug 30 (2.40%) +1.60% +0.20% N/A +0.60%
Aug 31 (0.92%) +0.53% +0.02% N/A +0.39%
Sep 01 +2.43% (1.65%) (0.07%) N/A (0.72%)
Sep 02* +0.66% (0.90%) (0.08%) N/A +0.22%
Sep 03 +0.23% (0.82%) (0.21%) +1.11% (0.19%)
Sep 04 +3.06% (2.28%) (0.22%) +0.04% (0.62%)

*The Chrome browser was launched late in the day GMT time on Sept 2nd so the first full day of tracking for Chrome is Sept 3rd.

This information is based on a total sample for the period of over 250 million page views globally. All daily stats are based on 24 hour periods, bar the stats for today, September 4th, which are based on a 12 hour sample to 12noon GMT.




Update September 5, 2008, 4.30pm GMT

Further to several requests from journalists, the latest stats for Global Browser Market Share (up to 3pm GMT today) are available for download here:
Excel Version (.xls)
PDF Version (.pdf)

143 comments on “Chrome – Who’s Losing?

  1. the uptick in IE doesn’t surprise me – school just started in North america and all those students and teachers are back online.

  2. As a statistician, I think that your data has far too many variations to be of any significance.
    There is just too much fluctuation in the numbers of IE for example, to be of any use.

  3. At first I was contented with firefox although it encounters more crash lately. But I’m still curious what this browser looks like and how it feels to browse. I glad I did try because I was impressed by the good and clean design, simplicity and speed. One example is the bookmark location at he right. It feels better to browse the bookmark because unlike firefox and IE, the bookmark drop down menu blocks your view on the webpage.

    The only disadvantage now are lack of add ons and plugins but it will surely come later.

  4. Jeanray: The upcoming Safari 4 (beta avail) does 100/100 on Acid3 tests. It’s hard to say after all it doesn’t conforms with the standards. And as it’s well known, Safari is using the same WebKit (originally developet for Konqueror) like Chrome does. You’ve right, some application doesn’t works well, but it’s version 0.2 (!) and thanks to WebKit in the near future hopefully it will be more standard compliant like anything else currently available.

  5. Hmmm .. I was actually thinking that Firefox will be the biggest loser. I tested Crome and it looks too unpolished, obviously there is much more to come. So far I have not found any good reason to switch, other than if you do not like Microsoft, but in that case you might be already using Firefox and not IE. My guess is that over the next one year Crome will have 10-15% market share.

  6. It’s surprising how Firefox loosing market share – but it’s also logical: IE users are mostly the common ‘I’ve just bought this PC to use internet’-type people, most of them absolutely don’t know and/or interested what kind of browsers do they use, but Firefox users are mostly developers, or friends of developers, or just people who are not afraid to try something new. Based on this logic, it’s not surprising why the latter kind of people switched to Chrome first. Chromium is also available for plugin development now, we hope Chrome will be a stable, good platform for future web development.

  7. As part of our development process, we check our websites on ALL major browsers, and we guarantee them to work there.
    Of course, Chrome is not yet in our list, and probably will NOT be for a long time: 6 of our latests sites, full AJAX, Web2.0 design, DON’T show up correctly – if they even work! – on Chrome!!!
    But, again, Chrome is based on Webkit (MAC), an browser engine that does not comply with any standards.
    Unless Chrome improves, it is not going to last very long…
    Out of our lists, anyway…

  8. I see an increase in IE usage also at the same time as Chrome increases. Are these poeple the ones that are BETA’ing IE8 as well as Chrome?

  9. This doesn’t surprise me at the least. The users of Chrome in the beta stage are the tech savvy, specifically web developers. This population, as a whole, is pretty heavily in to Firefox.

    I know a lot of people were commenting that this is a direct attack on Microsoft and IE, but that misses the fact that people that pick use the “non default” technologies, and that would thus switch to Chrome, are already using Firefox, or whatever. IE users are using IE because it’s already installed on their computer, and they probably don’t even realize there’s an alternative.

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